Saturday, August 30, 2014
vintagetoyarchive:

GAME GEMS: 1965 BEWITCHED Samantha and Endora Game

vintagetoyarchive:

GAME GEMS: 1965 BEWITCHED Samantha and Endora Game


David Duchovny as Fox Mulder and Gillian Anderson as Dana Scully in The X-Files

David Duchovny as Fox Mulder and Gillian Anderson as Dana Scully in The X-Files

(Source: 1428-elm-street)

Friday, August 29, 2014
grayflannelsuit:

Peanuts Pin-Up No. 1 (1963)

Charlie Brown and Snoopy with their Third Parent

grayflannelsuit:

Peanuts Pin-Up No. 1 (1963)

Charlie Brown and Snoopy with their Third Parent

retropopcult:

Alice & Sam

(Source: averybradyblog)

seventyskid:

lifeonmars70s: Deborah Van Valkenburgh

Happy Birthday Deborah Van Valkenburgh!

seventyskid:

lifeonmars70s: Deborah Van Valkenburgh

Happy Birthday Deborah Van Valkenburgh!

Thursday, August 28, 2014

gameraboy:

Mickey’s Polo Team (1936)

broadcastarchive-umd:

How ‘The Facts of Life’ Broke One of TV’s Most Taboo and Uncomfortable Topics:


TV sitcoms of the 1980s were often about teaching viewers a lesson. Sometimes subtly, usually overtly. Whether the message was moral or ethical in nature, the gist was one of acceptance: body image, race, sexuality, ability. And The Facts of Life, the longest-running sitcom of the decade, covered them all, breaking new TV ground for taboo and uncomfortable topics. 
Like having cerebral palsy and cracking jokes about it. 
In the ’80s, that was enough to tighten the sphincters of the politically correct across the country. Poking fun at a serious condition, an obvious physical challenge? The Facts of Life said sure, let’s do it. 
Read more: Geri Jewell: The Woman Who Broke the Barrier for Disabled Actors on TV | Performance | OZY

broadcastarchive-umd:

How ‘The Facts of Life’ Broke One of TV’s Most Taboo and
Uncomfortable Topics:

TV sitcoms of the 1980s were often about teaching viewers a lesson. Sometimes subtly, usually overtly. Whether the message was moral or ethical in nature, the gist was one of acceptance: body image, race, sexuality, ability. And The Facts of Life, the longest-running sitcom of the decade, covered them all, breaking new TV ground for taboo and uncomfortable topics. 

Like having cerebral palsy and cracking jokes about it. 

In the ’80s, that was enough to tighten the sphincters of the politically correct across the country. Poking fun at a serious condition, an obvious physical challenge? The Facts of Life said sure, let’s do it. 

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

(Source: jessicatates)

Tuesday, August 26, 2014